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Critically ill patients demonstrate large interpersonal variation in intestinal microbiota dysregulation: a pilot study

Overview of attention for article published in Intensive Care Medicine, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
Title
Critically ill patients demonstrate large interpersonal variation in intestinal microbiota dysregulation: a pilot study
Published in
Intensive Care Medicine, November 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00134-016-4613-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jacqueline M. Lankelma, Lonneke A. van Vught, Clara Belzer, Marcus J. Schultz, Tom van der Poll, Willem M. de Vos, W. Joost Wiersinga

Abstract

The intestinal microbiota has emerged as a virtual organ with essential functions in human physiology. Antibiotic-induced disruption of the microbiota in critically ill patients may have a negative influence on key energy resources and immunity. We set out to characterize the fecal microbiota composition in critically ill patients both with and without sepsis and to explore the use of microbiota-derived markers for clinical outcome measurements in this setting. In this prospective observational cohort study we analyzed the fecal microbiota of 34 patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Fifteen healthy subjects served as controls. The fecal microbiota was phylogenetically characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and associations with clinical outcome parameters were evaluated. A marked shift in fecal bacterial composition was seen in all septic and non-septic critically ill patients compared with controls, with extreme interindividual differences. In 13 of the 34 patients, a single bacterial genus made up >50% of the gut microbiota; in 4 patients this was even >75%. A significant decrease in bacterial diversity was observed in half of the patients. No associations were found between microbiota diversity, Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, or Gram-positive/Gram-negative ratio and outcome measurements such as complications and survival. We observed highly heterogeneous patterns of intestinal microbiota in both septic and non-septic critically ill patients. Nevertheless, some general patterns were observed, including disappearance of bacterial genera with important functions in host metabolism. More detailed knowledge of the short- and long-term health consequences of these major shifts in intestinal bacterial communities is needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 1%
Greece 1 1%
Unknown 76 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 21%
Unspecified 12 15%
Student > Master 11 14%
Researcher 9 12%
Professor 7 9%
Other 23 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 38%
Unspecified 19 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 9%
Other 7 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2017.
All research outputs
#992,590
of 13,316,854 outputs
Outputs from Intensive Care Medicine
#583
of 3,424 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,037
of 284,755 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Intensive Care Medicine
#17
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,316,854 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,424 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,755 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.