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Sleep quality and associated factors in ankylosing spondylitis: relationship with disease parameters, psychological status and quality of life

Overview of attention for article published in Rheumatology International, September 2012
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Title
Sleep quality and associated factors in ankylosing spondylitis: relationship with disease parameters, psychological status and quality of life
Published in
Rheumatology International, September 2012
DOI 10.1007/s00296-012-2513-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

İbrahim Batmaz, Mustafa Akif Sarıyıldız, Banu Dilek, Yasin Bez, Mehmet Karakoç, Remzi Çevik

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate sleep quality in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to evaluate the relationship of the disease parameters with sleep disturbance. Eighty AS patients (60 males and 20 females) fulfilling the modified New York criteria, and 52 age- and gender-matched controls (33 males and 19 females) were enrolled in the study. Sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Pain was measured by visual analogue scale. The disease activity and functional status were assessed by the Bath AS disease Activity Index and the Bath AS Functional Index. The Bath AS Metrology Index was used to evaluate mobility restrictions, and the Bath AS Radiology Index was employed to evaluate the radiological damage. The psychological status and quality of life were assessed with the hospital anxiety-depression scale and AS quality of life scale. The patients with AS had significantly more unfavourable scores in the subjective sleep quality, habitual sleep efficiency domains (p < 0.001) and the total PSQI score (p < 0.05). Poor sleep quality (total PSQI score) was positively correlated with increased pain, poor quality of life, higher depressed mood, higher disease activity and mobility restrictions. Pain was also an independent contributor to poorer sleep quality (p = 0.002). The sleep quality is disturbed in patients with AS. The lower quality of sleep is greatly associated with the pain, disease activity, depression, quality of life and increased limitation of mobility.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 21%
Unspecified 6 18%
Student > Master 6 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Other 10 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 32%
Unspecified 10 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 15%
Psychology 3 9%
Physics and Astronomy 2 6%
Other 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 April 2013.
All research outputs
#9,769,853
of 12,226,671 outputs
Outputs from Rheumatology International
#889
of 1,169 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,613
of 138,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Rheumatology International
#34
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,226,671 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,169 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.