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Genetic Counselor Workforce Issues: a Survey of Genetic Counselors Licensed in the State of Indiana

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Genetic Counseling, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
19 Mendeley
Title
Genetic Counselor Workforce Issues: a Survey of Genetic Counselors Licensed in the State of Indiana
Published in
Journal of Genetic Counseling, October 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10897-016-0026-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephanie A. Cohen, Megan E. Tucker, Paula Delk

Abstract

The aims of this study were to document movement of genetic counselors (GCs) out of clinical positions and identify factors that might help employers attract and retain clinical GCs. A confidential on-line survey of GCs ever licensed in the state of Indiana was conducted. Of the 46 respondents, most provide direct patient care (69.6 %), have worked in their current position for 5 years or less (72.1 %), and are experienced genetic counselors, having graduated between 6 and 15 years ago (43.5 %). One-third (32.6 %) reported thinking about leaving their current position at least monthly. GCs were more likely to think about leaving their current position when they provided direct patient care (p = 0.04) and worked in a hospital/clinic setting (p = 0.01). Among the 18 respondents that changed jobs in the past two years, 55.6 % currently work in a laboratory/industry setting and 44.4 % provide direct patient care, compared to 8 % of those in a stable position (N = 25) who work in a laboratory/industry setting (p < 0.01) and 88 % who provide direct patient care (p < 0.01). Genetic counselors who have changed jobs within the past 2 years were more satisfied with the possibility for advancement (p = 0.01), the recognition for work they do (p = 0.03) and feeling value from the organization (p = 0.04) in their current positions than those who have not changed jobs. Salary and flexibility were most often reported as reasons for changing jobs. This is the first documentation of the movement of GCs out of clinical roles into industry positions. This changing landscape may impact the access to clinical services and the training of genetic counseling students. This data will provide employers with data to help attract and retain GCs in clinical roles.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 68%
Unspecified 2 11%
Researcher 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 21%
Unspecified 3 16%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Computer Science 1 5%
Other 3 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2017.
All research outputs
#1,718,550
of 12,342,655 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Genetic Counseling
#98
of 637 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,498
of 268,765 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Genetic Counseling
#15
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,342,655 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 637 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,765 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.