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G-CSF-mobilized Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Replenish Neural Lineages in Alzheimer’s Disease Mice via CXCR4/SDF-1 Chemotaxis

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Neurobiology, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
7 Mendeley
Title
G-CSF-mobilized Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Replenish Neural Lineages in Alzheimer’s Disease Mice via CXCR4/SDF-1 Chemotaxis
Published in
Molecular Neurobiology, October 2016
DOI 10.1007/s12035-016-0122-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wu, Cheng-Chun, Wang, I-Fang, Chiang, Po-Min, Wang, Liang-Chao, Shen, Che-Kun James, Tsai, Kuen-Jer

Abstract

Recent studies reported granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment can improve the cognitive function of Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice, and the mobilized hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are proposed to be involved in this recovery effect. However, the exact role of mobilized HSC/BM-MSC in G-CSF-based therapeutic effects is still unknown. Here, we report that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)/stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) chemotaxis was a key mediator in G-CSF-based therapeutic effects, which was involved in the recruitment of repair-competent cells. Furthermore, we found both mobilized HSCs and BM-MSCs were able to infiltrate into the brain, but only BM-MSCs replenished the neural lineage cells and contributed to neurogenesis in the brains of AD mice. Together, our data show that mobilized BM-MSCs are involved in the replenishment of neural lineages following G-CSF treatment via CXCR4/SDF-1 chemotaxis and further support the potential use of BM-MSCs for further autogenically therapeutic applications.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 29%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 29%
Student > Master 1 14%
Researcher 1 14%
Lecturer 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 43%
Unspecified 2 29%
Neuroscience 1 14%
Psychology 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2016.
All research outputs
#1,256,982
of 8,515,357 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Neurobiology
#275
of 1,483 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,731
of 252,638 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Neurobiology
#26
of 90 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,515,357 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,483 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,638 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 90 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.