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Adolescence as a vulnerable period to alter rodent behavior

Overview of attention for article published in Cell & Tissue Research, February 2013
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Title
Adolescence as a vulnerable period to alter rodent behavior
Published in
Cell & Tissue Research, February 2013
DOI 10.1007/s00441-013-1581-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Miriam Schneider

Abstract

Adolescence and puberty are highly important periods for postnatal brain maturation. During adolescence, drastic changes of neuronal architecture and function occur that concomitantly lead to distinct behavioral alterations. Unsurprisingly in view of the multitude of ongoing neurodevelopmental processes in the adolescent brain, most adult neuropsychiatric disorders have their roots exactly during this time span. Adolescence and puberty are therefore crucial developmental periods in terms of understanding the causes and mechanisms of adult mental illness. Valid animal models for adolescent behavior and neurodevelopment might offer better insights into the underlying mechanisms and help to identify specific time windows with heightened susceptibility during development. In order to increase the translational value of such models, we urgently need to define the detailed timing of adolescence and puberty in laboratory rodents. The aim of the present review is to provide a more precise delineation of the time course of these developmental periods during postnatal life in rats and mice and to discuss the impact of adolescence and related neurodevelopmental processes on the heightened susceptibility for mental disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 106 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 13%
Student > Bachelor 13 12%
Student > Master 12 11%
Unspecified 11 10%
Other 35 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 26%
Neuroscience 26 24%
Psychology 21 19%
Unspecified 17 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 6%
Other 10 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2013.
All research outputs
#9,771,053
of 12,228,143 outputs
Outputs from Cell & Tissue Research
#1,091
of 1,535 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#95,689
of 136,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell & Tissue Research
#23
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,228,143 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,535 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.