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Retreat and extinction of the Late Pleistocene cave bear (Ursus spelaeus sensu lato)

Overview of attention for article published in Naturwissenschaften, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
35 Mendeley
Title
Retreat and extinction of the Late Pleistocene cave bear (Ursus spelaeus sensu lato)
Published in
Naturwissenschaften, October 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00114-016-1414-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mateusz Baca, Danijela Popović, Krzysztof Stefaniak, Adrian Marciszak, Mikołaj Urbanowski, Adam Nadachowski, Paweł Mackiewicz

Abstract

The cave bear (Ursus spelaeus sensu lato) is a typical representative of Pleistocene megafauna which became extinct at the end of the Last Glacial. Detailed knowledge of cave bear extinction could explain this spectacular ecological transformation. The paper provides a report on the youngest remains of the cave bear dated to 20,930 ± 140 (14)C years before present (BP). Ancient DNA analyses proved its affiliation to the Ursus ingressus haplotype. Using this record and 205 other dates, we determined, following eight approaches, the extinction time of this mammal at 26,100-24,300 cal. years BP. The time is only slightly earlier, i.e. 27,000-26,100 cal. years BP, when young dates without associated collagen data are excluded. The demise of cave bear falls within the coldest phase of the last glacial period, Greenland Stadial 3. This finding and the significant decrease in the cave bear records with cooling indicate that the drastic climatic changes were responsible for its extinction. Climate deterioration lowered vegetation productivity, on which the cave bear strongly depended as a strict herbivore. The distribution of the last cave bear records in Europe suggests that this animal was vanishing by fragmentation into subpopulations occupying small habitats. One of them was the Kraków-Częstochowa Upland in Poland, where we discovered the latest record of the cave bear and also two other, younger than 25,000 (14)C years BP. The relatively long survival of this bear in karst regions may result from suitable microclimate and continuous access to water provided by deep aquifers, indicating a refugial role of such regions in the Pleistocene for many species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 3%
Belgium 1 3%
Unknown 33 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 29%
Researcher 8 23%
Other 5 14%
Unspecified 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 6 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 34%
Environmental Science 6 17%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 17%
Unspecified 5 14%
Arts and Humanities 4 11%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 July 2017.
All research outputs
#855,087
of 12,462,651 outputs
Outputs from Naturwissenschaften
#180
of 1,420 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,527
of 266,059 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Naturwissenschaften
#6
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,462,651 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,420 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,059 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.