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The influence of pigmentation patterning on bumblebee foraging from flowers of Antirrhinum majus

Overview of attention for article published in Naturwissenschaften, February 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#33 of 1,322)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
twitter
4 tweeters
video
5 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
The influence of pigmentation patterning on bumblebee foraging from flowers of Antirrhinum majus
Published in
Naturwissenschaften, February 2013
DOI 10.1007/s00114-013-1020-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Whitney HM, Milne G, Rands SA, Vignolini S, Martin C, Glover BJ, Heather M. Whitney, Georgina Milne, Sean A. Rands, Silvia Vignolini, Cathie Martin, Beverley J. Glover

Abstract

Patterns of pigmentation overlying the petal vasculature are common in flowering plants and have been postulated to play a role in pollinator attraction. Previous studies report that such venation patterning is significantly more attractive to bee foragers in the field than ivory or white flowers without veins. To dissect the ways in which venation patterning of pigment can influence bumblebee behaviour, we investigated the response of flower-naïve individuals of Bombus terrestris to veined, ivory and red near-isogenic lines of Antirrhinum majus. We find that red venation shifts flower colour slightly, although the ivory background is the dominant colour. Bees were readily able to discriminate between ivory and veined flowers under differential conditioning but showed no innate preference when presented with a free choice of rewarding ivory and veined flowers. In contrast, both ivory and veined flowers were selected significantly more often than were red flowers. We conclude that advantages conferred by venation patterning might stem from bees learning of their use as nectar guides, rather than from any innate preference for striped flowers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 40 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 23%
Student > Bachelor 9 21%
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Master 7 16%
Professor 3 7%
Other 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 58%
Environmental Science 4 9%
Physics and Astronomy 4 9%
Materials Science 3 7%
Unspecified 2 5%
Other 5 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 78. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 March 2017.
All research outputs
#152,238
of 11,096,288 outputs
Outputs from Naturwissenschaften
#33
of 1,322 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,610
of 125,798 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Naturwissenschaften
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,096,288 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,322 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 125,798 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.