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Stiffness comparison of mushroom and straight SS and TMA lingual archwires

Overview of attention for article published in Progress in Orthodontics, September 2016
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Title
Stiffness comparison of mushroom and straight SS and TMA lingual archwires
Published in
Progress in Orthodontics, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40510-016-0140-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luca Lombardo, Antonella Carlucci, Mario Palone, Francesco Mollica, Giuseppe Siciliani

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate the relative stiffness of straight and mushroom lingual archwires of different diameters, cross sections and alloys, plotting their load/deflection graphs and using a modified three-point bending test. Fujita's mushroom archwires and straight lingual archwires of different diameters, cross sections and alloys were derived by a virtual set-up of an equal malocclusion and were cut at their straight distal portion. These distal portions were tested using a modified three-point bending test by an Instron 4467 dynamometer and the forces, were exerted at 1-mm deflection and were compared on each resulting load/deflection curve by means of ANOVA (p < 0.05). All upper lingual mushroom wires exerted significantly lower forces than the straight wire. Lower mushroom archwires were stiffer than their upper counterparts, which were longer and featured inset bends. In the lower arch, similar levels of forces were recorded for the two types of wire. Load-deflection curves were higher for the straight wires, and stiffness increased proportionally with their diameter. The stiffness of an archwire is a function of its diameter, length and the alloy it is made from. In lower lingual wires, there is little difference in stiffness between mushroom and straight wires, but in upper wires, the straight version is considerably stiffer. The greater bearing effect exhibited by the straight wire in the working and finishing phases makes it less susceptible to bowing effect and therefore preferable for sliding mechanics during en masse retraction, particularly in the upper arch.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 6 26%
Student > Master 3 13%
Unspecified 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 6 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 52%
Unspecified 2 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Unknown 7 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 September 2016.
All research outputs
#17,816,222
of 22,888,307 outputs
Outputs from Progress in Orthodontics
#142
of 234 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#230,884
of 322,308 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Progress in Orthodontics
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,888,307 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 234 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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