↓ Skip to main content

Follow-up of asymptomatic adult diaphragmatic hernia: should patients with this condition undergo immediate operation? A report of two cases

Overview of attention for article published in Surgical Case Reports, September 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
Title
Follow-up of asymptomatic adult diaphragmatic hernia: should patients with this condition undergo immediate operation? A report of two cases
Published in
Surgical Case Reports, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40792-016-0220-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ryota Takahashi, Shintaro Akamoto, Mina Nagao, Natsumi Matsuura, Masao Fujiwara, Keiichi Okano, Yasuyuki Suzuki

Abstract

Asymptomatic diaphragmatic hernia is generally thought to be rare among adults. We present two different types of asymptomatic diaphragmatic hernia diagnosed with computed tomography (CT) and discuss treatment strategies. Case 1: A 37-year-old woman was diagnosed with catamenial pneumothorax in the right diaphragm. Partial resection of the diaphragm and lung was performed using a linear stapler. She was asymptomatic after the operation and gave birth 2 years later. After delivery, she experienced recurrent pneumothorax, and CT revealed a right diaphragmatic defect with herniation of a part of the liver into the thorax. An iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia was diagnosed. There has been no change in the size of the hernia and no symptoms due to the diaphragmatic hernia for more than 3 years after it was diagnosed. Case 2: A 75-year-old woman was previously diagnosed with rectal cancer and had undergone surgery after chemoradiotherapy. One year after surgery, herniation of a 3 × 1.3-cm section of retroperitoneal fat tissue into the left thoracic cavity was observed incidentally at a follow-up CT and was diagnosed as an adult Bochdalek hernia (BH). We reviewed the patient's past CT findings and confirmed that the same finding had been present since the first scan. A wait-and-see approach was chosen because there had been no change in the size of hernia, there were no symptoms, the patient was elderly, and there was a high risk of recurrence of the rectal cancer. She has had no symptoms to date, and careful follow-up has been performed. There are few reports of asymptomatic adult diaphragmatic hernia. Although symptomatic diaphragmatic hernia is generally treated surgically, there are cases in which a wait-and-see approach has been applied, such as our asymptomatic cases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 19%
Student > Postgraduate 5 16%
Researcher 3 9%
Student > Master 2 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 13 41%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 44%
Computer Science 1 3%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Unknown 16 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 September 2016.
All research outputs
#18,469,995
of 22,886,568 outputs
Outputs from Surgical Case Reports
#174
of 488 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#251,851
of 330,061 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Surgical Case Reports
#6
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,886,568 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 488 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 0.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 330,061 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.