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Efficacy of posterior capsular release for flexion contracture in posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, November 2021
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

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2 tweeters

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3 Mendeley
Title
Efficacy of posterior capsular release for flexion contracture in posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty
Published in
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, November 2021
DOI 10.1186/s40634-021-00422-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tomofumi Kinoshita, Kazunori Hino, Tatsuhiko Kutsuna, Kunihiko Watamori, Takashi Tsuda, Hiromasa Miura

Abstract

Posterior capsular contracture causes stiffness during knee extension in knee osteoarthritis. Furthermore, in posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty (PS-TKA), a unique design such as the cam mechanism could conflict with the posterior capsule (PC) causing flexion contracture (FC). However, few studies have focused on the anatomical aspects of the PC. This study aimed to investigate the anatomical site and forms of posterior capsular attachment to the femoral cortex, and to evaluate the efficacy of posterior capsular release for FC by assessing changes in knee extension angles using a navigation system. Attachment sites of the PC were investigated in 10 cadaveric knees using computed tomography. PS-TKA was performed in six cadaveric knees using a navigation system to evaluate the efficacy of posterior capsular release for FC. Posterior capsular release was performed stepwise at each part of the femoral condyle. The gastrocnemius tendon and PC were integrally attached to the femoral cortex at the medial and lateral condyles, whereas the PC at the intercondylar fossa was independently attached directly to the femoral cortex. Moreover, the PC at the intercondylar fossa was attached most distally among each femoral condyle. Posterior capsular release at the intercondylar fossa allowed 11.4° ± 2.8° improvement in knee extension. This angle was further improved by 5.5° ± 1.3°, after subsequent capsular release at the medial and lateral condyles. The forms and sites of posterior capsular attachment differed based on the part of the femoral condyle. Stepwise posterior capsular release was effective for FC in PS-TKA. III.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 33%
Unknown 2 67%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 1 33%
Unknown 2 67%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2022.
All research outputs
#13,572,067
of 21,749,791 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics
#124
of 273 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,183
of 424,134 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics
#34
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,749,791 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 273 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 424,134 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.