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Appetite, gut hormone and energy intake responses to low volume sprint interval and traditional endurance exercise

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, October 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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20 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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82 Dimensions

Readers on

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98 Mendeley
Title
Appetite, gut hormone and energy intake responses to low volume sprint interval and traditional endurance exercise
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, October 2012
DOI 10.1007/s00421-012-2535-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kevin Deighton, Ruth Barry, Charlotte E. Connon, David J. Stensel

Abstract

Sprint interval exercise improves several health markers but the appetite and energy balance response is unknown. This study compared the effects of sprint interval and endurance exercise on appetite, energy intake and gut hormone responses. Twelve healthy males [mean (SD): age 23 (3) years, body mass index 24.2 (2.9) kg m(-2), maximum oxygen uptake 46.3 (10.2) mL kg(-1) min(-1)] completed three 8 h trials [control (CON), endurance exercise (END), sprint interval exercise (SIE)] separated by 1 week. Trials commenced upon completion of a standardised breakfast. Sixty minutes of cycling at 68.1 (4.3) % of maximum oxygen uptake was performed from 1.75-2.75 h in END. Six 30-s Wingate tests were performed from 2.25-2.75 h in SIE. Appetite ratings, acylated ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY) concentrations were measured throughout each trial. Food intake was monitored from buffet meals at 3.5 and 7 h and an overnight food bag. Appetite (P < 0.0005) and acylated ghrelin (P < 0.002) were suppressed during exercise but more so during SIE. Peptide YY increased during exercise but most consistently during END (P < 0.05). Acylated ghrelin was lowest in the afternoon of SIE (P = 0.018) despite elevated appetite (P = 0.052). Exercise energy expenditure was higher in END than that in SIE (P < 0.0005). Energy intake was not different between trials (P > 0.05). Therefore, relative energy intake (energy intake minus the net energy expenditure of exercise) was lower in END than that in CON (15.7 %; P = 0.006) and SIE (11.5 %; P = 0.082). An acute bout of endurance exercise resulted in lower appetite perceptions in the hours after exercise than sprint interval exercise and induced a greater 24 h energy deficit due to higher energy expenditure during exercise.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Portugal 1 1%
Unknown 95 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 26 27%
Student > Master 23 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 20%
Unspecified 6 6%
Student > Postgraduate 5 5%
Other 18 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 34 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 15%
Unspecified 13 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 6%
Other 12 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2014.
All research outputs
#834,933
of 11,657,165 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#408
of 2,695 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,921
of 124,058 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#6
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,657,165 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,695 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 124,058 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.