↓ Skip to main content

Sleep on it, but only if it is difficult: Effects of sleep on problem solving

Overview of attention for article published in Memory & Cognition, October 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 1,182)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
86 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
2 Facebook pages
reddit
2 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
123 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Sleep on it, but only if it is difficult: Effects of sleep on problem solving
Published in
Memory & Cognition, October 2012
DOI 10.3758/s13421-012-0256-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ut Na Sio, Padraic Monaghan, Tom Ormerod

Abstract

Previous research has shown that performance on problem solving improves over a period of sleep, as compared with wakefulness. However, these studies have not determined whether sleep is beneficial for problem solving or whether sleep merely mitigates against interference due to an interruption to solution attempts. Sleep-dependent improvements have been described in terms of spreading activation, which raises the prediction that an effect of sleep should be greater for problems requiring a broader solution search. We presented participants with a set of remote-associate tasks that varied in difficulty as a function of the strength of the stimuli-answer associations. After a period of sleep, wake, or no delay, participants reattempted previously unsolved problems. The sleep group solved a greater number of difficult problems than did the other groups, but no difference was found for easy problems. We conclude that sleep facilitates problem solving, most likely via spreading activation, but this has its primary effect for harder problems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 86 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 123 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Russia 2 2%
Brazil 2 2%
France 2 2%
Lithuania 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 113 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 26%
Student > Bachelor 23 19%
Student > Master 19 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 9 7%
Researcher 8 7%
Other 32 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 64 52%
Unspecified 15 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 9%
Neuroscience 6 5%
Computer Science 4 3%
Other 23 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 165. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 March 2019.
All research outputs
#83,583
of 13,377,075 outputs
Outputs from Memory & Cognition
#6
of 1,182 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#613
of 130,743 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Memory & Cognition
#1
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,377,075 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,182 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 130,743 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.