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Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, January 2002
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
7 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
70 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
67 Mendeley
Title
Published in
Archives of Sexual Behavior, January 2002
DOI 10.1023/a:1014031201935
Pubmed ID
Authors

James M. Cantor, Ray Blanchard, Andrew D. Paterson, Anthony F. Bogaert

Abstract

In men, sexual orientation correlates with the number of older brothers, each additional older brother increasing the odds of homosexuality by approximately 33%. However, this phenomenon, the fraternal birth order effect, accounts for the sexual orientation of only a proportion of gay men. To estimate the size of this proportion, we derived generalized forms of two epidemiological statistics, the attributable fraction and the population attributable fraction, which quantify the relationship between a condition and prior exposure to an agent that can cause it. In their common forms, these statistics are calculable only for 2 levels of exposure: exposed versus not-exposed. We developed a method applicable to agents with multiple levels of exposure--in this case, number of older brothers. This noniterative method, which requires the odds ratio from a prior logistic regression analysis, was then applied to a large contemporary sample of gay men. The results showed that roughly 1 gay man in 7 owes his sexual orientation to the fraternal birth order effect. They also showed that the effect of fraternal birth order would exceed all other causes of homosexuality in groups of gay men with 3 or more older brothers and would precisely equal all other causes in a theoretical group with 2.5 older brothers. Implications are suggested for the gay sib-pair linkage method of identifying genetic loci for homosexuality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 3%
United States 1 1%
Poland 1 1%
Turkey 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 61 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 24%
Student > Master 12 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 12%
Researcher 6 9%
Other 15 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 31 46%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 15%
Social Sciences 9 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Other 9 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 57. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2019.
All research outputs
#290,973
of 13,219,565 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#191
of 2,455 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,250
of 130,506 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#3
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,219,565 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,455 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 130,506 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.