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Novel systems for in vivo monitoring and microenvironmental investigations of diabetic neuropathy in a murine model

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neural Transmission, May 2012
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Title
Novel systems for in vivo monitoring and microenvironmental investigations of diabetic neuropathy in a murine model
Published in
Journal of Neural Transmission, May 2012
DOI 10.1007/s00702-012-0808-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sharon Amit, Avraham Yaron

Abstract

Peripheral neuropathy is a devastating complication of diabetes conferring vast morbidity and mortality. Despite prolonged efforts to elucidate the mechanisms underlying diabetic related neuropathic phenomena and develop effective therapies, current treatment is for the most part glycemic control and symptomatic care. This is partially due to the intricate pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy and the scarcity of valid experimental models. The aim of the study was to establish novel systems enabling monitoring and dissection of significant processes in the development of diabetic neuropathy. In a non-invasive in vivo model, two-photon microscopy is applied to evaluate mechanoreceptors (Meissner corpuscles) within an intact footpad of transgenic mice expressing a fluorescent neuronal tracer. By applying this advanced technology, which couples potent tissue penetration with superb resolution, we documented qualitative and quantitative diabetes-specific alterations in these sensory structures. Detection of such changes previously required laborious invasive histopathological techniques. In parallel, we present an ex vivo system that mimics the native microenvironment of the nerve ending via a unique co-culture of primary sensory neurons and thin skin slices. In conjunction with innovative high-throughput digital axonal measurements and computerized quantification tools, this method enables an unbiased exploration of neuronal autonomous and non-autonomous malfunctions. Using this setup we demonstrate that while the diabetic nerve retains a near-normal growth and regeneration capacities, the diabetic skin exhibits a decreased ability to support axonal outgrowth. Thus, an early target organ failure rather than intrinsic neuronal failure may initiate the neuropathy. Overall, the illustrated experimental platforms may greatly facilitate the holistic investigation of diabetic neuropathy.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 13%
Unknown 14 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 4 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 19%
Student > Master 3 19%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 13%
Librarian 1 6%
Other 3 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 13%
Computer Science 1 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Social Sciences 1 6%
Other 3 19%
Unknown 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2012.
All research outputs
#3,255,590
of 4,729,227 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neural Transmission
#337
of 532 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,547
of 81,037 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neural Transmission
#5
of 8 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 532 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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