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Sugars, obesity, and cardiovascular disease: results from recent randomized control trials

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Nutrition, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#23 of 1,501)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
256 tweeters
facebook
27 Facebook pages
googleplus
5 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
171 Mendeley
Title
Sugars, obesity, and cardiovascular disease: results from recent randomized control trials
Published in
European Journal of Nutrition, July 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00394-016-1257-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

James M. Rippe, Theodore J. Angelopoulos

Abstract

The relationship between sugar consumption and various health-related sequelas is controversial. Some investigators have argued that excessive sugar consumption is associated with increased risk of obesity, coronary heart disease, diabetes (T2D), metabolic syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and stimulation of reward pathways in the brain potentially causing excessive caloric consumption. These concerns have influenced organizations such as the World Health Organization, the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition in England not to exceed 5 % of total energy and the Dietary Guidelines for Americans Advisory Committee 2015 to recommend upper limits of sugar consumption not to exceed 10 % of calories. Data from many randomized control trials (RCTs) do not support linkages between sugar consumption at normal levels within the human diet and various adverse metabolic and health-related effects. Fructose and glucose are typically consumed together in roughly equal proportions from high-fructose corn syrup (also known as isoglucose in Europe) or sucrose. The purpose of this review is to present data from recent RCTs and findings from recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses related to sugar consumption and its putative health effects. This review evaluates findings from recent randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses into the relationship of sugar consumption and a range of health-related issues including energy-regulating hormones, obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and accumulation of liver fat and neurologic responses. Data from these sources do not support linkages between sugar consumption at normal levels within the human diet and various adverse metabolic and health-related effects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 256 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 171 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 169 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 21%
Student > Bachelor 31 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 13%
Unspecified 20 12%
Other 20 12%
Other 42 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 51 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 28 16%
Unspecified 27 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 13%
Sports and Recreations 12 7%
Other 31 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 195. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2019.
All research outputs
#70,178
of 13,656,298 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Nutrition
#23
of 1,501 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,806
of 257,634 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Nutrition
#2
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,656,298 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,501 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,634 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.