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The role of NLRP3 and AIM2 in inflammasome activation during Brucella abortus infection

Overview of attention for article published in Seminars in Immunopathology, July 2016
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30 Mendeley
Title
The role of NLRP3 and AIM2 in inflammasome activation during Brucella abortus infection
Published in
Seminars in Immunopathology, July 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00281-016-0581-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fernanda M. Marim, Miriam M. Costa Franco, Marco Tulio R. Gomes, Maria Cruz Miraglia, Guillermo H. Giambartolomei, Sergio Costa Oliveira

Abstract

The innate immune system is essential for the detection and elimination of bacterial pathogens. Upon inflammasome activation, caspase-1 cleaves pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18 to their mature forms IL-1β and IL-18, respectively, and the cell undergoes inflammatory death termed pyroptosis. Here, we reviewed recent findings demonstrating that Brucella abortus ligands activate NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasomes which lead to control of infection. This protective effect is due to the inflammatory response caused by IL-1β and IL-18 rather than cell death. Brucella DNA is sensed by AIM2 and bacteria-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species is detected by NLRP3. However, deregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production can lead to immunopathology. Nervous system invasion by bacteria of the genus Brucella results in an inflammatory disorder termed neurobrucellosis. Herein, we discuss the mechanism of caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion in glial cells infected with B. abortus. Our results demonstrate that the ASC inflammasome is indispensable for inducing the activation of caspase-1 and secretion of IL-1β upon infection of astrocytes and microglia with Brucella. Moreover, our results demonstrate that secretion of IL-1β by Brucella-infected glial cells depends on NLRP3 and AIM2 and leads to neurobrucellosis. Further, the inhibition of the host cell inflammasome as an immune evasion strategy has been described for bacterial pathogens. We discuss here that the bacterial type IV secretion system VirB is required for inflammasome activation in host cells during infection. Taken together, our results indicate that Brucella is sensed by ASC inflammasomes mainly NLRP3 and AIM2 that collectively orchestrate a robust caspase-1 activation and pro-inflammatory response.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 27%
Student > Bachelor 5 17%
Unspecified 3 10%
Other 1 3%
Other 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 20%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 20%
Unspecified 5 17%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 13%
Other 5 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2016.
All research outputs
#7,867,410
of 12,539,464 outputs
Outputs from Seminars in Immunopathology
#205
of 333 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,412
of 256,847 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Seminars in Immunopathology
#4
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,539,464 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 333 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,847 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.