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The cone photoreceptors and visual pigments of chameleons

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology, July 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
Title
The cone photoreceptors and visual pigments of chameleons
Published in
Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology, July 2005
DOI 10.1007/s00359-005-0014-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

James K. Bowmaker, Ellis R. Loew, Matthias Ott

Abstract

Visual pigments, oil droplets and photoreceptor types in the retinas of four species of true chameleons have been examined by microspectrophotometry. The species occupy different photic environments: two species of Chamaeleo are from Madagascar and two species of Furcifer are from Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. In addition to double cones, four spectrally distinct classes of single cone were identified. No rod photoreceptors were observed. The visual pigments appear to be mixtures of rhodopsins and porphyropsins. Double cones contained a pale oil droplet in the principle member and both outer segments contained a long-wave-sensitive visual pigment with a spectral maximum between about 555 nm and 610 nm, depending on the rhodopsin/porphyropsin mixture. Long-wave-sensitive single cones contained a visual pigment spectrally identical to the double cones, but combined with a yellow oil droplet. The other three classes of single cone contained visual pigments with maxima at about 480-505, 440-450 and 375-385 nm, combined with yellow, clear and transparent oil droplets respectively. The latter two classes were sparsely distributed. The transmission of the lens and cornea of C. dilepis was measured and found to be transparent throughout the visible and near ultraviolet, with a cut off at about 350 nm.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 10%
South Africa 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Malaysia 1 1%
Unknown 66 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 28%
Researcher 17 22%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Student > Master 6 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 6%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 5 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 50 63%
Environmental Science 5 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Neuroscience 4 5%
Chemistry 2 3%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 5 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2015.
All research outputs
#6,408,780
of 12,219,322 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology
#564
of 978 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,562
of 123,803 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology
#4
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,219,322 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 978 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 123,803 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.