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Physiological and Biomechanical Responses to Running on Lower Body Positive Pressure Treadmills in Healthy Populations

Overview of attention for article published in Sports Medicine, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

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34 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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45 Mendeley
Title
Physiological and Biomechanical Responses to Running on Lower Body Positive Pressure Treadmills in Healthy Populations
Published in
Sports Medicine, July 2016
DOI 10.1007/s40279-016-0581-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kathryn A. Farina, Alexis A. Wright, Kevin R. Ford, Leah Anne Wirfel, James M. Smoliga

Abstract

Lower body positive pressure treadmills (LBPPTs) aim to reduce musculoskeletal loading during running. As LBPPTs have become more commercially available, they have become integrated into athletic performance and clinical rehabilitation settings. Consequentially, published research examining the biomechanical and physiological responses to unweighted running has increased. The purpose of this systematic review was to synthesize the literature in an attempt to provide researchers and clinicians with a comprehensive review of physiologic and biomechanical responses to LBPPT running. Through a generic search of PubMed, CINAHL, MEDLINE, and SPORTDiscus using a comprehensive list of search terms related to LBPPT, unweighting, and body weight support during running, we identified all peer-reviewed publications that included LBPPT running. Two reviewers independently evaluated the quality of studies using a modified Downs and Black checklist for non-randomized studies. A total of 15 articles met the inclusion criteria for this review. Peak and active vertical ground-reaction forces were consistently reduced with unweighting, but regional loading within the foot was also altered towards a forefoot strike. LBPPTs also provide some horizontal assistance. Neuromuscular activation is generally reduced with LBPPTs, but the stabilizer muscle groups may respond differently than the propulsive muscle groups. Submaximal heart rate and volume oxygen consumption are reduced with unweighting, but physiologic response remains generally unchanged at maximal intensities. The current literature suggests that LBPPTs are effective in allowing individuals to achieve a given metabolic stimulus with reduced musculoskeletal loading. However, LBPPTs not only reduce impact but also change neuromuscular activation and biomechanics in a complex manner. Thus, clinicians must account for the specific biomechanical and physiological alterations induced by LBPPTs when designing training programs and rehabilitation protocols.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 34 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 20%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Lecturer 4 9%
Researcher 4 9%
Other 13 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 18 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 22%
Unspecified 7 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 11%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 25. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 June 2019.
All research outputs
#636,219
of 13,218,736 outputs
Outputs from Sports Medicine
#643
of 2,188 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,436
of 260,480 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sports Medicine
#17
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,218,736 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,188 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,480 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.