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The autism-spectrum quotient (AQ): evidence from Asperger syndrome/high-functioning autism, males and females, scientists and mathematicians.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, January 2001
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#27 of 3,250)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
78 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
2482 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
2140 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
The autism-spectrum quotient (AQ): evidence from Asperger syndrome/high-functioning autism, males and females, scientists and mathematicians.
Published in
Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, January 2001
DOI 10.1023/a:1005653411471
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simon Baron-Cohen, Sally Wheelwright, Richard Skinner, Joanne Martin, Emma Clubley, Baron-Cohen, S, Wheelwright, S, Skinner, R, Martin, J, Clubley, E

Abstract

Currently there are no brief, self-administered instruments for measuring the degree to which an adult with normal intelligence has the traits associated with the autistic spectrum. In this paper, we report on a new instrument to assess this: the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ). Individuals score in the range 0-50. Four groups of subjects were assessed: Group 1: 58 adults with Asperger syndrome (AS) or high-functioning autism (HFA); Group 2: 174 randomly selected controls. Group 3: 840 students in Cambridge University; and Group 4: 16 winners of the UK Mathematics Olympiad. The adults with AS/HFA had a mean AQ score of 35.8 (SD = 6.5), significantly higher than Group 2 controls (M = 16.4, SD = 6.3). 80% of the adults with AS/HFA scored 32+, versus 2% of controls. Among the controls, men scored slightly but significantly higher than women. No women scored extremely highly (AQ score 34+) whereas 4% of men did so. Twice as many men (40%) as women (21%) scored at intermediate levels (AQ score 20+). Among the AS/HFA group, male and female scores did not differ significantly. The students in Cambridge University did not differ from the randomly selected control group, but scientists (including mathematicians) scored significantly higher than both humanities and social sciences students, confirming an earlier study that autistic conditions are associated with scientific skills. Within the sciences, mathematicians scored highest. This was replicated in Group 4, the Mathematics Olympiad winners scoring significantly higher than the male Cambridge humanities students. 6% of the student sample scored 32+ on the AQ. On interview, 11 out of 11 of these met three or more DSM-IV criteria for AS/HFA, and all were studying sciences/mathematics, and 7 of the 11 met threshold on these criteria. Test-retest and interrater reliability of the AQ was good. The AQ is thus a valuable instrument for rapidly quantifying where any given individual is situated on the continuum from autism to normality. Its potential for screening for autism spectrum conditions in adults of normal intelligence remains to be fully explored.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 78 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2,140 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 34 2%
United Kingdom 24 1%
Canada 13 <1%
France 8 <1%
Netherlands 7 <1%
Germany 6 <1%
Japan 5 <1%
Australia 4 <1%
Italy 4 <1%
Other 28 1%
Unknown 2007 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 464 22%
Student > Bachelor 408 19%
Student > Master 339 16%
Researcher 279 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 158 7%
Other 491 23%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 1174 55%
Unspecified 201 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 178 8%
Neuroscience 157 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 134 6%
Other 295 14%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 146. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 May 2019.
All research outputs
#95,271
of 13,233,790 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#27
of 3,250 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#586
of 102,425 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#1
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,233,790 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,250 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 102,425 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.