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Massage therapy for fibromyalgia symptoms

Overview of attention for article published in Rheumatology International, March 2010
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
104 Mendeley
connotea
1 Connotea
Title
Massage therapy for fibromyalgia symptoms
Published in
Rheumatology International, March 2010
DOI 10.1007/s00296-010-1409-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leonid Kalichman

Abstract

Massage therapy is widely used by patients with fibromyalgia seeking symptom relief. We performed a review of all available studies with an emphasis on randomized controlled trials to determine whether massage therapy can be a viable treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms. Extensive narrative review. PubMed, PsychInfo, CINAHL, PEDro, ISI Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases (inception-December 2009) were searched for the key words "massage", "massotherapy", "self-massage", "soft tissue manipulation", "soft tissue mobilization", "complementary medicine", "fibromyalgia" "fibrositis", and "myofascial pain". No language restrictions were imposed. The reference lists of all articles retrieved in full were also searched. The effects of massage on fibromyalgia symptoms have been examined in two single-arm studies and six randomized controlled trials. All reviewed studies showed short-term benefits of massage, and only one single-arm study demonstrated long-term benefits. All reviewed studies had methodological problems. The existing literature provides modest support for use of massage therapy in treating fibromyalgia. Additional rigorous research is needed in order to establish massage therapy as a safe and effective intervention for fibromyalgia. In massage therapy of fibromyalgia, we suggest that massage will be painless, its intensity should be increased gradually from session to session, in accordance with patient's symptoms; and the sessions should be performed at least 1-2 times a week.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Norway 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Spain 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 95 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 25 24%
Student > Master 19 18%
Student > Postgraduate 14 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 11%
Other 7 7%
Other 28 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 49 47%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 16%
Unspecified 8 8%
Psychology 8 8%
Sports and Recreations 8 8%
Other 14 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 July 2013.
All research outputs
#7,027,080
of 12,226,671 outputs
Outputs from Rheumatology International
#646
of 1,169 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,638
of 122,629 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Rheumatology International
#10
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,226,671 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,169 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 122,629 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.