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The impact of targeted subsidies for facility-based delivery on access to care and equity – Evidence from a population-based study in rural Burkina Faso

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Public Health Policy, August 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
Title
The impact of targeted subsidies for facility-based delivery on access to care and equity – Evidence from a population-based study in rural Burkina Faso
Published in
Journal of Public Health Policy, August 2012
DOI 10.1057/jphp.2012.27
Pubmed ID
Authors

Manuela De Allegri, Valéry Ridde, Valérie R Louis, Malabika Sarker, Justin Tiendrebéogo, Maurice Yé, Olaf Müller, Albrecht Jahn

Abstract

We conducted the first population-based impact assessment of a financing policy introduced in Burkina Faso in 2007 on women's access to delivery services. The policy offers an 80 per cent subsidy for facility-based delivery. We collected information on delivery in five repeated cross-sectional surveys carried out from 2006 to 2010 on a representative sample of 1050 households in rural Nouna Health District. Over the 5 years, the proportion of facility-based deliveries increased from 49 to 84 per cent (P<0.001). The utilization gap across socio-economic quintiles, however, remained unchanged. The amount received for all services associated with births decreased by 67 per cent (P<0.001), but women continued to pay on average 1423 CFA (\[euro]1=655 CFA), about 500 CFA more than the set tariff of 900 CFA. Our findings indicate the operational effectiveness of the policy in increasing the use of facility-based delivery services for women. The potential to reduce maternal mortality substantially has not yet been assessed by health outcome measures of neonatal and maternal mortality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 4%
United Kingdom 1 2%
India 1 2%
Unknown 44 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Researcher 4 8%
Unspecified 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 13 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 14 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 13%
Unspecified 4 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 6%
Other 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 September 2012.
All research outputs
#6,650,620
of 13,047,983 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Public Health Policy
#381
of 532 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,955
of 124,467 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Public Health Policy
#6
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,047,983 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 532 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 124,467 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.