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Internet Pornography Use, Perceived Addiction, and Religious/Spiritual Struggles

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
16 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
69 Mendeley
Title
Internet Pornography Use, Perceived Addiction, and Religious/Spiritual Struggles
Published in
Archives of Sexual Behavior, June 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10508-016-0772-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joshua B. Grubbs, Julie J. Exline, Kenneth I. Pargament, Fred Volk, Matthew J. Lindberg

Abstract

Prior work has demonstrated that religious beliefs and moral attitudes are often related to sexual functioning. The present work sought to examine another possibility: Do sexual attitudes and behaviors have a relationship with religious and spiritual functioning? More specifically, do pornography use and perceived addiction to Internet pornography predict the experience of religious and spiritual struggle? It was expected that feelings of perceived addiction to Internet pornography would indeed predict such struggles, both cross-sectionally and over time, but that actual pornography use would not. To test these ideas, two studies were conducted using a sample of undergraduate students (N = 1519) and a sample of adult Internet users in the U.S. (N = 713). Cross-sectional analyses in both samples found that elements of perceived addiction were related to the experience of religious and spiritual struggle. Additionally, longitudinal analyses over a 1-year time span with a subset of undergraduates (N = 156) and a subset of adult web users (N = 366) revealed that perceived addiction to Internet pornography predicted unique variance in struggle over time, even when baseline levels of struggle and other related variables were held constant. Collectively, these findings identify perceived addiction to Internet pornography as a reliable predictor of religious and spiritual struggle.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 16%
Unspecified 11 16%
Student > Master 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Other 19 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 34 49%
Unspecified 15 22%
Social Sciences 7 10%
Arts and Humanities 3 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Other 7 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 55. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2019.
All research outputs
#309,845
of 13,406,972 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#203
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,763
of 261,852 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#4
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,406,972 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,852 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.