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Investigating the Measurement Properties of the Social Responsiveness Scale in Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, August 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
82 Mendeley
Title
Investigating the Measurement Properties of the Social Responsiveness Scale in Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Published in
Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, August 2012
DOI 10.1007/s10803-012-1627-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric Duku, Tracy Vaillancourt, Peter Szatmari, Stelios Georgiades, Lonnie Zwaigenbaum, Isabel M. Smith, Susan Bryson, Eric Fombonne, Pat Mirenda, Wendy Roberts, Joanne Volden, Charlotte Waddell, Ann Thompson, Teresa Bennett

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the measurement properties of the Social Responsiveness Scale in an accelerated longitudinal sample of 4-year-old preschool children with the complementary approaches of categorical confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch analysis. Measurement models based on the literature and other hypothesized measurement models which were tested using categorical confirmatory factor analysis did not fit well and were not unidimensional. Rasch analyses showed that a 30-item subset met criteria of unidimensionality and invariance across item, person, and over time; and this subset exhibited convergent validity with other child outcomes. This subset was shown to have enhanced psychometric properties and could be used in measuring social responsiveness among preschool age children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 2%
Namibia 1 1%
Israel 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 76 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 26%
Researcher 11 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 12%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Professor 8 10%
Other 23 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 34 41%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 17%
Social Sciences 14 17%
Unspecified 9 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Other 7 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2013.
All research outputs
#1,688,181
of 3,628,758 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#944
of 1,501 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,734
of 75,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#29
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,628,758 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 52nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,501 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 75,392 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.