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Surface-processing technology of a microgrooving and water-repellent coating improves the fusion potential of an ultrasonic energy device

Overview of attention for article published in Surgical Endoscopy, June 2016
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Title
Surface-processing technology of a microgrooving and water-repellent coating improves the fusion potential of an ultrasonic energy device
Published in
Surgical Endoscopy, June 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00464-016-5048-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Satoru Okada, Junichi Shimada, Kazuhiro Ito, Tatsuo Ishii, Koichiro Oshiumi

Abstract

Ultrasonic energy devices are essential for effective hemostasis during endoscopic surgery. Ultrasonic tissue transection occurs as a result of mechanical friction between the oscillating blade and the tissue. We hypothesized that blade surface structures and characteristics would affect tissue transection and sealing. The aim of this study was to clarify the efficacy of blade surface structures and characteristics in vessel sealing with an ultrasonic vibration. We developed an ultrasonic energy device with 50-kHz vibration frequency and 50 μm amplitude. We manufactured four types of blade surface of the ultrasonic device using microprocessing technology: (1) a non-coated blade without microgrooves, (2) a non-coated blade with microgrooves, (3) a water-repellent-coated blade without microgrooves, and (4) a water-repellent-coated blade with microgrooves. We compared the performance of the four devices and a commercially available ultrasonic device with a non-coated blade without microgrooves in an ex vivo vessel-sealing experiment. We sealed porcine carotid arteries (3-5 mm diameter) using each device 20 times. The cutting time of the water-repellent-coated blade with microgrooves was the shortest (11.0 ± 3.4 s); however, it did not differ significantly from that of the commercial ultrasonic device (12.9 ± 2.9 s, p = 0.73). The burst pressure of the water-repellent-coated blade without microgrooves (1456 ± 425 mmHg) was significantly higher than that of the commercial ultrasonic device (966 ± 559 mmHg, p = 0.04). The sealing failure rate of the water-repellent blade with microgrooves was the lowest of all devices (0 %). Instrumental sticking of tissue decreased in the water-repellent devices. The sealing width was not significantly different. The surface-processing of microgrooves and water-repellent coatings will improve the potential of ultrasonic devices with a fast transection and a high sealing reliability.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 1 33%
Researcher 1 33%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 67%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2017.
All research outputs
#9,771,832
of 12,229,156 outputs
Outputs from Surgical Endoscopy
#2,871
of 3,571 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,453
of 270,900 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Surgical Endoscopy
#175
of 243 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 243 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.