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Decreasing level of resistance in invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated in Marseille, January 2012–July 2015

Overview of attention for article published in SpringerPlus, May 2016
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Title
Decreasing level of resistance in invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated in Marseille, January 2012–July 2015
Published in
SpringerPlus, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40064-016-2296-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cédric Abat, Didier Raoult, Jean-Marc Rolain

Abstract

Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterial species well known for its capacity to cause infections in humans, and to carry and spread a wide variety of resistance genes including extended-spectrum beta-lactamase genes, carbapenem resistance genes, and colistin resistance genes. Recently, our real-time laboratory-based surveillance system MARSS (the Marseille Antibiotic Resistance Surveillance System) allowed us to observe a intringing dramatic decrease in the beta-lactam resistance level of the K. pneumoniae strains routinely isolated from patients hospitalized in our settings since 2013. Here we study the evolution of the prevalence of K. pneumoniae infections in Marseille university hospitals, France, from January 2012 to July 2015, and study their antibiotic resistance profiles. We collected data referring to patients hostpitalized for K. pneumoniae infections in the 4 university hospitals of Marseille from January 2012 to July 2015. We then study their antibiotic resistance profiles according the clinical sites from which each strain was collected. Antibiotic consumption data from our four hospitals were also analyzed from January 2013 to July 2015. Overall, 4868 patients were admitted in our settings for K. pneumoniae infections over the study period. Overall, 40.1, 22.3, 25.6, 0.4, 29.9, 14.8, 27.3 and 37.0 % of the strains were resistant to amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid, piperacillin-tazobactam, ceftriaxone, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and furan, respectively. 447 were invasive infections. The resistance level of our invasive strains was significantly lower than that presented by 11, 7, 10 and 11 other European countries included in the 2013 European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network report for ceftriaxone, imipenem, ciprofloxacin and gentamicin, respectively, but significantly higher than that of 13, 1, 17 and 13 European countries for the same antibiotics. We also observed that the percentages of resistance of our invasive strains to three of the four antibiotics decreased over the study. In parallel, antibiotic consumption remained stable in our four hospitals from January 2013 to July 2015. Altogether, our results underline that automated antibiotic-susceptibility testing results-based surveillance systems are crucial to better understand the evolving epidemiology of dangerous pathogenic bacterial species, like K. pneumoniae, at local scales.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 24%
Student > Master 4 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 24%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 June 2016.
All research outputs
#4,164,010
of 7,936,934 outputs
Outputs from SpringerPlus
#756
of 1,715 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,114
of 262,309 outputs
Outputs of similar age from SpringerPlus
#67
of 110 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,936,934 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,715 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,309 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 110 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.