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Physiological Profiles of Elite Judo Athletes

Overview of attention for article published in Sports Medicine, February 2011
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312 Mendeley
Title
Physiological Profiles of Elite Judo Athletes
Published in
Sports Medicine, February 2011
DOI 10.2165/11538580-000000000-00000
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emerson Franchini, Fabrício B. Del Vecchio, Karin A. Matsushigue, Guilherme G. Artioli

Abstract

To be successful in international competitions, judo athletes must achieve an excellent level of physical fitness and physical condition during training. This article reviews the physiological profiles of elite judo athletes from different sex, age and weight categories. Body fat is generally low for these athletes, except for the heavyweight competitors. In general, elite judo athletes presented higher upper body anaerobic power and capacity than non-elite athletes. Lower body dynamic strength seems to provide a distinction between elite and recreational judo players, but not high-level judo players competing for a spot on national teams. Even maximal isometric strength is not a discriminant variable among judo players. However, more studies focusing on isometric strength endurance are warranted. Although aerobic power and capacity are considered relevant to judo performance, the available data do not present differences among judo athletes from different competitive levels. Typical maximal oxygen uptake values are around 50-55 mL/kg/min for male and 40-45 mL/kg/min for female judo athletes. As for other variables, heavyweight competitors presented lower aerobic power values. The typical differences commonly observed between males and females in the general population are also seen in judo athletes when analysing anaerobic power and capacity, aerobic power, and maximal strength and power. However, further research is needed concerning the differences among the seven weight categories in which judo athletes compete.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 312 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 5 2%
Spain 3 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Poland 3 <1%
Malaysia 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Lithuania 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 290 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 67 21%
Student > Master 58 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 13%
Unspecified 31 10%
Researcher 30 10%
Other 87 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 190 61%
Unspecified 41 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 4%
Other 27 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2012.
All research outputs
#2,903,508
of 3,628,496 outputs
Outputs from Sports Medicine
#909
of 1,010 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,476
of 73,655 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sports Medicine
#81
of 93 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,628,496 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,010 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 73,655 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 93 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.