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Mortality and pulmonary mechanics in relation to respiratory system and transpulmonary driving pressures in ARDS

Overview of attention for article published in Intensive Care Medicine, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
158 Mendeley
Title
Mortality and pulmonary mechanics in relation to respiratory system and transpulmonary driving pressures in ARDS
Published in
Intensive Care Medicine, June 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00134-016-4403-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elias Baedorf Kassis, Stephen H. Loring, Daniel Talmor

Abstract

The driving pressure of the respiratory system has been shown to strongly correlate with mortality in a recent large retrospective ARDSnet study. Respiratory system driving pressure [plateau pressure-positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP)] does not account for variable chest wall compliance. Esophageal manometry can be utilized to determine transpulmonary driving pressure. We have examined the relationships between respiratory system and transpulmonary driving pressure, pulmonary mechanics and 28-day mortality. Fifty-six patients from a previous study were analyzed to compare PEEP titration to maintain positive transpulmonary end-expiratory pressure to a control protocol. Respiratory system and transpulmonary driving pressures and pulmonary mechanics were examined at baseline, 5 min and 24 h. Analysis of variance and linear regression were used to compare 28 day survivors versus non-survivors and the intervention group versus the control group, respectively. At baseline and 5 min there was no difference in respiratory system or transpulmonary driving pressure. By 24 h, survivors had lower respiratory system and transpulmonary driving pressures. Similarly, by 24 h the intervention group had lower transpulmonary driving pressure. This decrease was explained by improved elastance and increased PEEP. The results suggest that utilizing PEEP titration to target positive transpulmonary pressure via esophageal manometry causes both improved elastance and driving pressures. Treatment strategies leading to decreased respiratory system and transpulmonary driving pressure at 24 h may be associated with improved 28 day mortality. Studies to clarify the role of respiratory system and transpulmonary driving pressures as a prognosticator and bedside ventilator target are warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 158 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 155 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 28 18%
Other 22 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 13%
Unspecified 19 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 15 9%
Other 53 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 118 75%
Unspecified 21 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 4%
Engineering 5 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 1%
Other 5 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 August 2016.
All research outputs
#1,220,847
of 12,226,048 outputs
Outputs from Intensive Care Medicine
#648
of 3,135 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,940
of 271,335 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Intensive Care Medicine
#9
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,226,048 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,135 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,335 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.