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Plasma fluorescent oxidation products and risk of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer in the Nurses’ Health Study and Nurses’ Health Study II

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, June 2016
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Title
Plasma fluorescent oxidation products and risk of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer in the Nurses’ Health Study and Nurses’ Health Study II
Published in
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, June 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10549-016-3861-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kelly A. Hirko, Renée T. Fortner, Susan E. Hankinson, Tianying Wu, A. Heather Eliassen

Abstract

Findings from epidemiologic studies of oxidative stress biomarkers and breast cancer have been mixed, although no studies have focused on estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) tumors which may be more strongly associated with oxidative stress. We examined prediagnostic plasma fluorescent oxidation products (FlOP), a global biomarker of oxidative stress, and risk of ER- breast cancer in a nested case-control study in the Nurses' Health Study and Nurses' Health Study II. ER- breast cancer cases (n = 355) were matched to 355 controls on age, month/time of day of blood collection, fasting status, menopausal status, and menopausal hormone use. Conditional logistic regression models were used to examine associations of plasma FlOP at three emission wavelengths (FlOP_360, FlOP_320, and FlOP_400) and risk of ER- breast cancer. We did not observe any significant associations between FlOP measures and risk of ER- breast cancer overall; the RRQ4vsQ1 (95 %CI) 0.70 (0.43-1.13), p trend = 0.09 for FlOP_360; 0.91(0.56-1.46), p trend = 0.93 for FlOP_320; and 0.62 (0.37-1.03), p trend = 0.10 for FlOP_400. Results were similar in models additionally adjusted for total carotenoid levels and in models stratified by age and total carotenoids. Although high (vs. low) levels of FIOP_360 and FIOP_400 were associated with lower risk of ER- breast cancer in lean women (body mass index (BMI) < 25 kg/m(2)) but not in overweight/obese women, these differences were not statistically significant (pint = 0.23 for FlOP_360; pint = 0.37 for FlOP_400). Our findings suggest that positive associations of plasma FlOP concentrations and ER- breast cancer risk are unlikely.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 22%
Researcher 2 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 22%
Professor 1 11%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 11%
Other 1 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 44%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 22%
Unspecified 1 11%
Psychology 1 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 11%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2016.
All research outputs
#10,932,246
of 12,334,049 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
#2,722
of 3,102 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#227,750
of 275,211 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
#85
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,334,049 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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