↓ Skip to main content

Provider-Initiated HIV Testing and Counseling in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review

Overview of attention for article published in AIDS & Behavior, July 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
74 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
145 Mendeley
Title
Provider-Initiated HIV Testing and Counseling in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review
Published in
AIDS & Behavior, July 2012
DOI 10.1007/s10461-012-0241-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Caitlin E. Kennedy, Virginia A. Fonner, Michael D. Sweat, F. Amolo Okero, Rachel Baggaley, Kevin R. O’Reilly

Abstract

Provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling (PITC) has expanded since 2007 WHO guidelines were established. We conducted a systematic review of PITC in low- and middle-income countries. Peer-reviewed studies were included if they measured pre-post or multi-arm outcomes. Two coders abstracted data using standardized forms. Nineteen studies were included, all from sub-Saharan Africa (N = 15) or Asia (N = 4). Studies were conducted in clinics for antenatal/family planning/child health (N = 12), tuberculosis (N = 4), outpatient (N = 1), sexually transmitted diseases (N = 1), and methadone maintenance (N = 1). HIV testing uptake increased after PITC. Condom use also increased following PITC in most studies; nevirapine uptake and other outcomes were mixed. Few negative outcomes were identified. Findings support PITC as an important intervention to increase HIV testing. PITC's impact on other outcomes is mixed, but does not appear to be worse than voluntary counseling and testing. PITC should continue to be expanded and rigorously evaluated across settings and outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 145 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Tanzania, United Republic of 2 1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Botswana 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Unknown 136 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 36 25%
Student > Master 29 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 14%
Unspecified 12 8%
Other 10 7%
Other 37 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 66 46%
Social Sciences 27 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 11%
Unspecified 15 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 3%
Other 17 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2015.
All research outputs
#1,120,828
of 12,321,014 outputs
Outputs from AIDS & Behavior
#149
of 2,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,733
of 117,917 outputs
Outputs of similar age from AIDS & Behavior
#7
of 71 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,321,014 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,338 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 117,917 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 71 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.