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The Root-Associated Microbial Community of the World’s Highest Growing Vascular Plants

Overview of attention for article published in Microbial Ecology, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 1,277)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
65 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
Title
The Root-Associated Microbial Community of the World’s Highest Growing Vascular Plants
Published in
Microbial Ecology, May 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00248-016-0779-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Roey Angel, Ralf Conrad, Miroslav Dvorsky, Martin Kopecky, Milan Kotilínek, Inga Hiiesalu, Fritz Schweingruber, Jiří Doležal

Abstract

Upward migration of plants to barren subnival areas is occurring worldwide due to raising ambient temperatures and glacial recession. In summer 2012, the presence of six vascular plants, growing in a single patch, was recorded at an unprecedented elevation of 6150 m.a.s.l. close to the summit of Mount Shukule II in the Western Himalayas (Ladakh, India). Whilst showing multiple signs of stress, all plants have managed to establish stable growth and persist for several years. To learn about the role of microbes in the process of plant upward migration, we analysed the root-associated microbial community of the plants (three individuals from each) using microscopy and tagged amplicon sequencing. No mycorrhizae were found on the roots, implying they are of little importance to the establishment and early growth of the plants. However, all roots were associated with a complex bacterial community, with richness and diversity estimates similar or even higher than the surrounding bare soil. Both soil and root-associated communities were dominated by members of the orders Sphingomonadales and Sphingobacteriales, which are typical for hot desert soils, but were different from communities of temperate subnival soils and typical rhizosphere communities. Despite taxonomic similarity on the order level, the plants harboured a unique set of highly dominant operational taxonomic units which were not found in the bare soil. These bacteria have been likely transported with the dispersing seeds and became part of the root-associated community following germination. The results indicate that developing soils act not only as a source of inoculation to plant roots but also possibly as a sink for plant-associated bacteria.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 65 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Czechia 1 2%
Unknown 57 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 29%
Student > Master 12 20%
Researcher 8 14%
Unspecified 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Other 11 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 47%
Environmental Science 13 22%
Unspecified 9 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 12%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 85. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2016.
All research outputs
#186,334
of 13,253,954 outputs
Outputs from Microbial Ecology
#5
of 1,277 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,167
of 266,151 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbial Ecology
#1
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,253,954 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,277 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,151 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.