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Transposing musical skill: sonification of movement as concurrent augmented feedback enhances learning in a bimanual task

Overview of attention for article published in Psychological Research, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
Title
Transposing musical skill: sonification of movement as concurrent augmented feedback enhances learning in a bimanual task
Published in
Psychological Research, May 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00426-016-0775-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

John Dyer, Paul Stapleton, Matthew Rodger

Abstract

Concurrent feedback provided during acquisition can enhance performance of novel tasks. The 'guidance hypothesis' predicts that feedback provision leads to dependence and poor performance in its absence. However, appropriately structured feedback information provided through sound ('sonification') may not be subject to this effect. We test this directly using a rhythmic bimanual shape-tracing task in which participants learned to move at a 4:3 timing ratio. Sonification of movement and demonstration was compared to two other learning conditions: (1) Sonification of task demonstration alone and (2) completely silent practice (control). Sonification of movement emerged as the most effective form of practice, reaching significantly lower error scores than control. Sonification of solely the demonstration, which was expected to benefit participants by perceptually unifying task requirements, did not lead to better performance than control. Good performance was maintained by participants in the Sonification condition in an immediate retention test without feedback, indicating that the use of this feedback can overcome the guidance effect. On a 24-h retention test, performance had declined and was equal between groups. We argue that this and similar findings in the feedback literature are best explained by an ecological approach to motor skill learning which places available perceptual information at the highest level of importance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 50 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 33%
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Researcher 3 6%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 7 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 14 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 10%
Engineering 4 8%
Computer Science 3 6%
Unspecified 3 6%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 12 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 June 2016.
All research outputs
#4,051,669
of 14,079,291 outputs
Outputs from Psychological Research
#162
of 681 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,459
of 265,856 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychological Research
#6
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,079,291 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 681 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,856 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.