↓ Skip to main content

No evidence of morbidity compression in Spain: a time series study based on national hospitalization records

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Public Health, May 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
Title
No evidence of morbidity compression in Spain: a time series study based on national hospitalization records
Published in
International Journal of Public Health, May 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00038-016-0829-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stefan Walter, Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez, Enrique Regidor, Carlos Gomez-Martin, Jose Luis del-Barrio, Angel Gil-de-Miguel, S. V. Subramanian, Ruth Gil-Prieto

Abstract

Compression of morbidity postulates that as the populations age, the age of onset of disease is postponed. The objective of this study is to test for evidence of compression of morbidity in Spain. We calculated the age and sex-specific incidence of myocardial infarction, heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, as well as bladder, prostate, breast, lung, and colon cancer among hospital discharges covering 99.5 % of the Spanish population, approximately 40 million inhabitants for two non-overlapping periods, 1997-2000 and 2007-2010, and estimated the length of life spent with disease using the Sullivan method. We found that expansion of morbidity due to an earlier age-specific onset of incident disease and increase in life expectancy was the norm in Spain. Notable exceptions were cardiovascular disease in women (-0.2 % time spent with disease) and lung cancer for men (-0.9 % time spent with disease) from 1997-2000 to 2007-2010. Compression of morbidity is often cited by policy makers when discussing adjustments to the health-care system. If morbidity is measured by age at onset of disease, the burden of morbidity has increased in Spain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 24%
Student > Master 4 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 19%
Professor 3 14%
Other 2 10%
Other 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 48%
Unspecified 3 14%
Social Sciences 3 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 10%
Neuroscience 1 5%
Other 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 October 2018.
All research outputs
#1,996,286
of 12,801,967 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Public Health
#328
of 957 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,884
of 264,445 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Public Health
#12
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,801,967 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 957 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,445 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.