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Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Overview of attention for article published in European Radiology, May 2012
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About this Attention Score

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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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107 Dimensions

Readers on

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105 Mendeley
Title
Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging
Published in
European Radiology, May 2012
DOI 10.1007/s00330-012-2446-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. O. Leach, B. Morgan, P. S. Tofts, D. L. Buckley, W. Huang, M. A. Horsfield, T. L. Chenevert, D. J. Collins, A. Jackson, D. Lomas, B. Whitcher, L. Clarke, R. Plummer, I. Judson, R. Jones, R. Alonzi, T. Brunner, D. M. Koh, P. Murphy, J. C. Waterton, G. Parker, M. J. Graves, T. W. J. Scheenen, T. W. Redpath, M. Orton, G. Karczmar, H. Huisman, J. Barentsz, A. Padhani

Abstract

Many therapeutic approaches to cancer affect the tumour vasculature, either indirectly or as a direct target. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important means of investigating this action, both pre-clinically and in early stage clinical trials. For such trials, it is essential that the measurement process (i.e. image acquisition and analysis) can be performed effectively and with consistency among contributing centres. As the technique continues to develop in order to provide potential improvements in sensitivity and physiological relevance, there is considerable scope for between-centre variation in techniques. A workshop was convened by the Imaging Committee of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) to review the current status of DCE-MRI and to provide recommendations on how the technique can best be used for early stage trials. This review and the consequent recommendations are summarised here. Key Points • Tumour vascular function is key to tumour development and treatment • Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) can assess tumour vascular function • Thus DCE-MRI with pharmacokinetic models can assess novel treatments • Many recent developments are advancing the accuracy of and information from DCE-MRI • Establishing common methodology across multiple centres is challenging and requires accepted guidelines.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 2%
Germany 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
United States 2 2%
Norway 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 94 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 30%
Researcher 30 29%
Professor 8 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 5%
Other 25 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 52 50%
Physics and Astronomy 15 14%
Unspecified 13 12%
Engineering 10 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 7%
Other 8 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2012.
All research outputs
#4,321,274
of 8,163,518 outputs
Outputs from European Radiology
#455
of 1,004 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,898
of 94,062 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Radiology
#8
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,163,518 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,004 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 94,062 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.