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Enhancing the Application and Evaluation of a Discrete Trial Intervention Package for Eliciting First Words in Preverbal Preschoolers with ASD

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, September 2011
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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96 Mendeley
Title
Enhancing the Application and Evaluation of a Discrete Trial Intervention Package for Eliciting First Words in Preverbal Preschoolers with ASD
Published in
Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, September 2011
DOI 10.1007/s10803-011-1358-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ioanna Tsiouri, Elizabeth Schoen Simmons, Rhea Paul

Abstract

This study evaluates the effectiveness of an intervention package including a discrete trial program (Rapid Motor Imitation Antecedent Training (Tsiouri and Greer, J Behav Educat 12:185-206, 2003) combined with parent education for eliciting first words in children with ASD who had little or no spoken language. Evaluation of the approach includes specific intervention targets and functional spoken language outcomes (Tager-Flusberg et al., J Speech Lang Hear Res 52:643-652, 2009). Results suggest that RMIA, with parent training, catalyzes development of verbal imitation and production for some children. Three of five participants acquired word production within the DTT framework and achieved milestones of early functional spoken language use (Tager-Flusberg et al., J Speech Lang Hear Res 52:643-652, 2009). The implications of these findings for understanding the role of discrete trial approaches to language intervention are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 2%
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 92 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 24%
Researcher 17 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 9%
Student > Bachelor 8 8%
Other 25 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 31 32%
Social Sciences 17 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 13%
Unspecified 9 9%
Other 14 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2012.
All research outputs
#1,531,226
of 3,635,018 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#899
of 1,504 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,876
of 72,328 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#33
of 62 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,635,018 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,504 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 72,328 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 62 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.