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SmLEA2, a gene for late embryogenesis abundant protein isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza, confers tolerance to drought and salt stress in Escherichia coli and S. miltiorrhiza

Overview of attention for article published in Protoplasma, May 2016
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Title
SmLEA2, a gene for late embryogenesis abundant protein isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza, confers tolerance to drought and salt stress in Escherichia coli and S. miltiorrhiza
Published in
Protoplasma, May 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00709-016-0981-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Huaiqin Wang, Yucui Wu, Xinbing Yang, Xiaorong Guo, Xiaoyan Cao

Abstract

Abiotic stresses, such as drought and high salinity, are major factors that limit plant growth and productivity. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are members of a diverse, multigene family closely associated with tolerance to abiotic stresses in numerous organisms. We examined the function of SmLEA2, previously isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza, in defense responses to drought and high salinity. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that SmLEA2 belongs to the LEA_2 subfamily. Its overexpression in Escherichia coli improved growth performance when compared with the control under salt and drought stresses. We further characterized its roles in S. miltiorrhiza through overexpression and RNAi-mediated silencing. In response to drought and salinity treatments, transgenic plants overexpressing SmLEA2 exhibited significantly increased superoxide dismutase activity, reduced levels of lipid peroxidation, and more vigorous growth than empty-vector control plants did. However, transgenic lines in which expression was suppressed showed the opposite results. Our data demonstrate that SmLEA2 plays an important role in the abiotic stress response and its overexpression in transgenic S. miltiorrhiza improves tolerance to excess salt and drought conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 33%
Student > Master 3 25%
Professor 2 17%
Researcher 1 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 25%
Unspecified 2 17%
Chemical Engineering 1 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2016.
All research outputs
#11,568,460
of 13,018,329 outputs
Outputs from Protoplasma
#465
of 634 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,340
of 264,380 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Protoplasma
#18
of 31 outputs
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