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Social Support During the Postpartum Period: Mothers’ Views on Needs, Expectations, and Mobilization of Support

Overview of attention for article published in Maternal & Child Health Journal, May 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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93 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
237 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Social Support During the Postpartum Period: Mothers’ Views on Needs, Expectations, and Mobilization of Support
Published in
Maternal & Child Health Journal, May 2012
DOI 10.1007/s10995-012-1037-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rennie Negron, Anika Martin, Meital Almog, Amy Balbierz, Elizabeth A. Howell

Abstract

Research has indicated that social support is a major buffer of postpartum depression. Yet little is known concerning women's perceptions on social support during the postpartum period. The objective of this study was to explore postpartum women's views and experiences with social support following childbirth. Four focus groups were conducted with an ethnically diverse sample of women (n = 33) in a large urban teaching hospital in New York City. Participants had completed participation in a postpartum depression randomized trial and were 6-12 months postpartum. Data transcripts were reviewed and analyzed for themes. The main themes identified in the focus group discussions were mother's major needs and challenges postpartum, social support expectations and providers of support, how mothers mobilize support, and barriers to mobilizing support. Women across all groups identified receipt of instrumental support as essential to their physical and emotional recovery. Support from partners and families was expected and many women believed this support should be provided without asking. Racial/ethnic differences existed in the way women from different groups mobilized support from their support networks. Instrumental support plays a significant role in meeting women's basic needs during the postpartum period. In addition, women's expectations surrounding support can have an impact on their ability to mobilize support among their social networks. The results of this study suggest that identifying support needs and expectations of new mothers is important for mothers' recovery after childbirth. Future postpartum depression prevention efforts should integrate a strong focus on social support.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 237 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 232 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 49 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 17%
Student > Bachelor 38 16%
Unspecified 28 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 25 11%
Other 57 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 59 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 44 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 39 16%
Social Sciences 38 16%
Unspecified 37 16%
Other 20 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 May 2019.
All research outputs
#2,415,596
of 13,420,122 outputs
Outputs from Maternal & Child Health Journal
#286
of 1,417 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,325
of 121,257 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Maternal & Child Health Journal
#4
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,420,122 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,417 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 121,257 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.