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Treatment outcomes of hepatectomy for liver metastases of gastric cancer diagnosed using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Overview of attention for article published in Gastric Cancer, May 2016
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Title
Treatment outcomes of hepatectomy for liver metastases of gastric cancer diagnosed using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging
Published in
Gastric Cancer, May 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10120-016-0611-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Taichi Tatsubayashi, Yutaka Tanizawa, Yuichiro Miki, Masanori Tokunaga, Etsuro Bando, Taiichi Kawamura, Teiichi Sugiura, Yusuke Kinugasa, Katsuhiko Uesaka, Masanori Terashima

Abstract

Chemotherapy is the standard treatment for liver metastases of gastric cancer (LMGC). Hepatectomy for LMGC reportedly has a 5-year survival rate of 13-37 %; however, its significance has not been established. At our hospital, hepatectomy is performed for patients with three or fewer metastases diagnosed using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To identify the ideal patient subpopulation for resection, we retrospectively analyzed treatment outcomes in patients with LMGC who underwent hepatectomy. Clinicopathological factors affecting survival were explored using univariate and multivariate analyses in 28 patients who underwent hepatectomy for LMGC diagnosed using contrast-enhanced MRI between December 2004 and October 2014. The study included 23 men and 5 women with a median age of 72 years. Metastases were synchronous in 15 patients and metachronous in 13 patients. The median overall survival time was 49 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 32 %. Univariate analysis revealed that overall survival time was shorter in the presence of the following factors: age ≥70 years (p = 0.030), synchronous liver metastases (p = 0.017), and presence of postoperative complications (p = 0.042). In patients with metachronous liver metastases, the post-resection 5-year survival rate was 59 %. The 5-year survival rate was 32 % in patients who underwent hepatectomy for LMGC according to our criteria, suggesting that hepatectomy is an important treatment if indications are on the basis of contrast-enhanced MRI. Therefore, active resection should be considered, particularly for patients with metachronous liver metastases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 25%
Unspecified 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Other 4 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 56%
Unspecified 2 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Other 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 May 2016.
All research outputs
#6,639,145
of 7,672,691 outputs
Outputs from Gastric Cancer
#107
of 161 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,624
of 267,458 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gastric Cancer
#4
of 5 outputs
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