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Prognostic implication of antitumor immunity measured by the neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio and serum cytokines and angiogenic factors in gastric cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Gastric Cancer, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#44 of 161)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

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2 tweeters

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
Title
Prognostic implication of antitumor immunity measured by the neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio and serum cytokines and angiogenic factors in gastric cancer
Published in
Gastric Cancer, May 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10120-016-0613-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chan-Young Ock, Ah-Rong Nam, Joongyub Lee, Ju-Hee Bang, Kyung-Hun Lee, Sae-Won Han, Tae-Yong Kim, Seock-Ah Im, Tae-You Kim, Yung-Jue Bang, Do-Youn Oh

Abstract

The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is associated with a poor prognosis in many cancers but the biological mechanisms involved are unknown. Since cytokines and angiogenic factors (CAFs) are reflected by various immune responses, we analyzed the association between the NLR and CAFs and their prognostic implications in gastric cancer (GC). Of 745 GC patients who were enrolled in NLR analysis, 70 underwent NLR and CAF association analyses. Pretreatment serum levels of 52 CAFs were measured by means of multiplex bead immunoassays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Linear regression analysis and survival analysis of the NLR with each CAF were performed. Metastatic organ numbers and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels were significantly higher in patients with a high NLR [greater than 2.42 (median): P = 0.047 and P < 0.001 respectively]. The overall survival was significantly worse in the high NLR group (17.8 months vs 11.2 months, P < 0.001). In CAF analysis, osteopontin (R (2) = 0.337, P < 0.001) and interleukin-6 (R (2) = 0.141, P = 0.001) were significantly associated with the NLR. Stromal-cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) was a significant poor prognostic factor independently of the NLR. Consideration of both the NLR and SDF-1 divided patient groups with different overall survival (both low, 21.0 months; either high, 15.8 months; both high, 8.2 months). The NLR is a significant poor prognostic factor in advanced GC. The NLR is mainly associated with osteopontin and interleukin-6. Besides the NLR, SDF-1 is an independent poor prognostic factor in GC. Consideration of both the NLR and SDF-1 might give insights into antitumor immunity in GC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 33%
Unspecified 3 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Student > Postgraduate 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Other 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 60%
Unspecified 4 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,940,167
of 7,662,843 outputs
Outputs from Gastric Cancer
#44
of 161 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,631
of 266,690 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gastric Cancer
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,662,843 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 161 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,690 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them