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Shuttling happens: soluble flavin mediators of extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella

Overview of attention for article published in Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology, November 2011
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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146 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
232 Mendeley
Title
Shuttling happens: soluble flavin mediators of extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella
Published in
Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology, November 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00253-011-3653-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Evan D. Brutinel, Jeffrey A. Gralnick

Abstract

The genus Shewanella contains Gram negative γ-proteobacteria capable of reducing a wide range of substrates, including insoluble metals and carbon electrodes. The utilization of insoluble respiratory substrates by bacteria requires a strategy that is quite different from a traditional respiratory strategy because the cell cannot take up the substrate. Electrons generated by cellular metabolism instead must be transported outside the cell, and perhaps beyond, in order to reduce an insoluble substrate. The primary focus of research in model organisms such as Shewanella has been the mechanisms underlying respiration of insoluble substrates. Electrons travel from the menaquinone pool in the cytoplasmic membrane to the surface of the bacterial cell through a series of proteins collectively described as the Mtr pathway. This review will focus on respiratory electron transfer from the surface of the bacterial cell to extracellular substrates. Shewanella sp. secrete redox-active flavin compounds able to transfer electrons between the cell surface and substrate in a cyclic fashion-a process termed electron shuttling. The production and secretion of flavins as well as the mechanisms of cell-mediated reduction will be discussed with emphasis on the experimental evidence for a shuttle-based mechanism. The ability to reduce extracellular substrates has sparked interest in using Shewanella sp. for applications in bioremediation, bioenergy, and synthetic biology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 232 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 3%
United Kingdom 4 2%
India 2 <1%
Philippines 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Unknown 215 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 77 33%
Researcher 40 17%
Student > Bachelor 32 14%
Student > Master 27 12%
Unspecified 15 6%
Other 41 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 81 35%
Environmental Science 31 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 29 13%
Chemistry 27 12%
Unspecified 20 9%
Other 44 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2012.
All research outputs
#7,026,541
of 12,225,271 outputs
Outputs from Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology
#3,589
of 5,233 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,830
of 113,154 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology
#28
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,225,271 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,233 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 113,154 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.