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Feedforward activity of the cervical flexor muscles during voluntary arm movements is delayed in chronic neck pain

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental Brain Research, July 2004
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1 tweeter
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Citations

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187 Dimensions

Readers on

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282 Mendeley
Title
Feedforward activity of the cervical flexor muscles during voluntary arm movements is delayed in chronic neck pain
Published in
Experimental Brain Research, July 2004
DOI 10.1007/s00221-003-1814-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

D. Falla, G. Jull, P. W. Hodges

Abstract

The objective of this study was to compare onset of deep and superficial cervical flexor muscle activity during rapid, unilateral arm movements between ten patients with chronic neck pain and 12 control subjects. Deep cervical flexor (DCF) electromyographic activity (EMG) was recorded with custom electrodes inserted via the nose and fixed by suction to the posterior mucosa of the oropharynx. Surface electrodes were placed over the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and anterior scalene (AS) muscles. While standing, subjects flexed and extended the right arm in response to a visual stimulus. For the control group, activation of DCF, SCM and AS muscles occurred less than 50 ms after the onset of deltoid activity, which is consistent with feedforward control of the neck during arm flexion and extension. When subjects with a history of neck pain flexed the arm, the onsets of DCF and contralateral SCM and AS muscles were significantly delayed ( p<0.05). It is concluded that the delay in neck muscle activity associated with movement of the arm in patients with neck pain indicates a significant deficit in the automatic feedforward control of the cervical spine. As the deep cervical muscles are fundamentally important for support of the cervical lordosis and the cervical joints, change in the feedforward response may leave the cervical spine vulnerable to reactive forces from arm movement.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 282 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Belgium 2 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Other 4 1%
Unknown 263 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 68 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 12%
Student > Bachelor 32 11%
Researcher 27 10%
Other 22 8%
Other 99 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 141 50%
Unspecified 35 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 31 11%
Sports and Recreations 19 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 5%
Other 41 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2019.
All research outputs
#8,186,954
of 13,571,715 outputs
Outputs from Experimental Brain Research
#1,285
of 2,305 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,936
of 121,308 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental Brain Research
#20
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,571,715 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,305 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 121,308 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.