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Cachexia and protein-energy wasting in children with chronic kidney disease

Overview of attention for article published in Pediatric Nephrology, February 2011
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1 tweeter

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36 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
Title
Cachexia and protein-energy wasting in children with chronic kidney disease
Published in
Pediatric Nephrology, February 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00467-011-1765-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert H. Mak, Wai W. Cheung, Jian-Ying Zhan, Qian Shen, Bethany J. Foster

Abstract

Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at risk for "cachexia" or "protein-energy wasting" (PEW). These terms describe a pathophysiologic process resulting in the loss of muscle, with or without loss of fat, and involving maladaptive responses, including anorexia and elevated metabolic rate. PEW has been defined specifically in relation to CKD. We review the diagnostic criteria for cachexia and PEW in CKD and consider the limitations and applicability of these criteria to children with CKD. In addition, we present an overview of the manifestations and mechanisms of cachexia and PEW. A host of pathogenetic factors are considered, including systemic inflammation, endocrine perturbations, and abnormal neuropeptide signaling, as well as poor nutritional intake. Mortality risk, which is 100- to 200-fold higher in patients with end-stage renal disease than in the general population, is strongly correlated with the components of cachexia/PEW. Further research into the causes and consequences of wasting and growth retardation is needed in order to improve the survival and quality of life for children with CKD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Professor 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 2 6%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 17 47%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 17 47%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2012.
All research outputs
#10,834,843
of 12,222,672 outputs
Outputs from Pediatric Nephrology
#1,717
of 1,916 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,870
of 112,743 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pediatric Nephrology
#19
of 26 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.