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Gambling Harm and Crime Careers

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Gambling Studies, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
Title
Gambling Harm and Crime Careers
Published in
Journal of Gambling Studies, April 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10899-016-9612-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Corinne May-Chahal, Leslie Humphreys, Alison Clifton, Brian Francis, Gerda Reith

Abstract

Incarcerated populations across the world have been found to be consistently and significantly more vulnerable to problem gambling than general populations in the same countries. In an effort to gain a more specific understanding of this vulnerability the present study applied latent class analysis and criminal career theory to gambling data collected from a sample of English and Scottish, male and female prisoners (N = 1057). Theoretical links between gambling and crime were tested through three hypotheses: (1) that prisoners in the UK would have higher rates of problem gambling behaviour than the national population; (2) that if the link between gambling and crime is coincidental, gambling behaviour would be highly prevalent in an offending population, and (3) if connections between gambling behaviour and offending are co-symptomatic a mediating factor would show a strong association. The first of these was supported, the second was not supported and the third was partially supported. Latent class analysis found six gambling behaviour clusters measured by responses to the Problem Gambling Severity Index, primarily distinguished by loss chasing behaviour. Longitudinal offending data drawn from the Police National Computer database found four criminal career types, distinguished by frequency and persistence over time. A significant association was found between higher level loss chasing and high rate offending in criminal careers suggesting that impulse control may be a mediating factor for both gambling harm and criminal careers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 20%
Student > Master 4 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Professor 2 8%
Other 6 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 6 24%
Social Sciences 6 24%
Unspecified 5 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2017.
All research outputs
#6,835,604
of 13,204,933 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Gambling Studies
#351
of 618 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,349
of 263,378 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Gambling Studies
#14
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,204,933 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 618 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,378 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.