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Religious attitudes towards living kidney donation among Dutch renal patients

Overview of attention for article published in Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy, April 2011
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Title
Religious attitudes towards living kidney donation among Dutch renal patients
Published in
Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy, April 2011
DOI 10.1007/s11019-011-9326-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sohal Y. Ismail, Emma K. Massey, Annemarie E. Luchtenburg, Lily Claassens, Willij C. Zuidema, Jan J. v. Busschbach, Willem Weimar

Abstract

Terminal kidney patients are faced with lower quality of life, restricted diets and higher morbidity and mortality rates while waiting for deceased donor kidney transplantation. Fortunately, living kidney donation has proven to be a better treatment alternative (e.g. in terms of waiting time and graft survival rates). We observed an inequality in the number of living kidney transplantations performed between the non-European and the European patients in our center. Such inequality has been also observed elsewhere in this field and it has been suggested that this inequality relates to, among other things, attitude differences towards donation based on religious beliefs. In this qualitative research we investigated whether religion might indeed (partly) be the explanation of the inequalities in living donor kidney transplants (LDKT) among non-European patients. Fifty patients participated in focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. The interviews were conducted following the focus group method and analyzed in line with Grounded Theory. The qualitative data analyses were performed in Atlas.ti. We found that religion is not perceived as an obstacle to living donation and that religion actually promotes helping and saving the life of a person. Issues such as integrity of the body were not seen as barriers to LDKT. We observed also that there are still uncertainties and a lack of awareness about the position of religion regarding living organ donation within communities, confusion due to varying interpretations of Holy Scriptures and misconceptions regarding the process of donation. Faith leaders play an important educational role and their opinion is influential. This study has identified modifiable factors which may contribute to the ethnic disparity in our living donation program. We argue that we need to strive for more clarity and awareness regarding the stance of religion on the issue of living donation in the local community. Faith leaders could be key figures in increasing awareness and alleviating uncertainty regarding living donation and transplantation.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Taiwan 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 39 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 23%
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Unspecified 4 9%
Professor 3 7%
Other 14 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 28%
Social Sciences 7 16%
Psychology 7 16%
Unspecified 4 9%
Computer Science 3 7%
Other 10 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2012.
All research outputs
#9,460,949
of 12,343,108 outputs
Outputs from Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy
#270
of 361 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,807
of 115,113 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy
#13
of 17 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 361 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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