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Effect of forest bathing trips on human immune function

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine, March 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 282)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
59 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
97 tweeters
facebook
18 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
7 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
101 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
196 Mendeley
Title
Effect of forest bathing trips on human immune function
Published in
Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine, March 2009
DOI 10.1007/s12199-008-0068-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qing Li

Abstract

In Japan, a forest bathing trip, called "Shinrinyoku" in Japanese, is a short, leisurely visit to a forest; it is regarded as being similar to natural aromatherapy. This review focuses on the effects of forest bathing trips on human immune function. Beginning in 2005, adult Japanese individuals, both male and female, participated in a series of studies aimed at investigating the effect of forest bathing trips on human immune function. The subjects experienced a 3-day/2-night trip to forest areas, and blood and urine were sampled on days 2 (the first sampling during each trip) and 3 (the second sampling during each trip), and on days 7 and 30 after the trips. Natural killer (NK) activity, the numbers of NK, granulysin-, perforin-, and granzymes A/B-expressing lymphocytes in the blood, and the concentration of urinary adrenaline were measured. The same measurements were made before the trips on a normal working day as a control. The mean values of NK activity and the numbers of NK, granulysin-, perforin-, and granzymes A/B-expressing cells on forest bathing days were significantly higher than those on the control days, whereas the mean values of the concentration of urinary adrenaline on forest bathing days were significantly lower than that on the control days in both male and female subjects. The increased NK activity lasted for more than 30 days after the trip, suggesting that a forest bathing trip once a month would enable individuals to maintain a higher level of NK activity. In contrast, a visit to the city as a tourist did not increase NK activity, the numbers of NK cells, or the level of intracellular granulysin, perforin, and granzymes A/B. These findings indicate that forest bathing trips resulted in an increase in NK activity, which was mediated by increases in the number of NK cells and the levels of intracellular granulysin, perforin, and granzymes A/B.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 97 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 196 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 3%
Canada 2 1%
Japan 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 186 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 34 17%
Student > Master 29 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 14%
Researcher 28 14%
Other 16 8%
Other 61 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 24 12%
Social Sciences 22 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 11%
Environmental Science 20 10%
Other 87 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 580. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 August 2019.
All research outputs
#11,870
of 13,384,384 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine
#2
of 282 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42
of 120,467 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,384,384 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 282 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 120,467 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them