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On the molecular genetics of flexibility: The case of task-switching, inhibitory control and genetic variants

Overview of attention for article published in Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience, October 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#43 of 560)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
Title
On the molecular genetics of flexibility: The case of task-switching, inhibitory control and genetic variants
Published in
Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience, October 2011
DOI 10.3758/s13415-011-0058-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sebastian Markett, Christian Montag, Nora T. Walter, Thomas Plieger, Martin Reuter

Abstract

The adjustment of behavior to changing goals and environmental constraints requires the flexible switching between different task sets. Cognitive flexibility is an endophenotype of executive functioning and is highly heritable, as indicated by twin studies. Individual differences in global flexibility as assessed by reaction-time measurement in a task-switching paradigm were recently related to a single nucleotide polymorphism in the vicinity of the dopamine d2 receptor gene DRD2. In the present study, we assessed whether the DRD2 gene is related to backward inhibition, a control mechanism that contributes to cognitive flexibility by reducing proactive interference by no longer relevant task sets. We found that carriers of the DRD2 A1+ variant who have a lower striatal dopamine d2 receptor density than A1- carriers show a larger backward inhibition effect. This is in line with previous results demonstrating increased behavioral flexibility in carriers of this genetic variant. The discussion relates the present finding to those of previous studies assessing the neurogenetic foundations of inhibitory control.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 3%
Russia 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 62 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 17%
Researcher 9 14%
Student > Master 9 14%
Professor 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 11%
Other 23 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 36 55%
Unspecified 8 12%
Neuroscience 7 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 9%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Other 6 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 September 2016.
All research outputs
#697,579
of 8,430,317 outputs
Outputs from Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
#43
of 560 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,302
of 95,034 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
#1
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,430,317 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 560 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 95,034 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.