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HPTN 068: A Randomized Control Trial of a Conditional Cash Transfer to Reduce HIV Infection in Young Women in South Africa—Study Design and Baseline Results

Overview of attention for article published in AIDS & Behavior, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
Title
HPTN 068: A Randomized Control Trial of a Conditional Cash Transfer to Reduce HIV Infection in Young Women in South Africa—Study Design and Baseline Results
Published in
AIDS & Behavior, February 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10461-015-1270-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Audrey Pettifor, Catherine MacPhail, Amanda Selin, F. Xavier Gómez-Olivé, Molly Rosenberg, Ryan G. Wagner, Wonderful Mabuza, James P. Hughes, Chirayath Suchindran, Estelle Piwowar-Manning, Jing Wang, Rhian Twine, Tamu Daniel, Philip Andrew, Oliver Laeyendecker, Yaw Agyei, Stephen Tollman, Kathleen Kahn

Abstract

Young women in South Africa are at high risk for HIV infection. Cash transfers offer promise to reduce HIV risk. We present the design and baseline results from HPTN 068, a phase III, individually randomized trial to assess the effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV acquisition among South African young women. A total of 2533 young women were randomized to receive a monthly cash transfer conditional on school attendance or to a control group. A number of individual-, partner-, household- and school-level factors were associated with HIV and HSV-2 infection. After adjusting for age, all levels were associated with an increased odds of HIV infection with partner-level factors conveying the strongest association (aOR 3.05 95 % CI 1.84-5.06). Interventions like cash transfers that address structural factors such as schooling and poverty have the potential to reduce HIV risk in young women in South Africa.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 81 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 23%
Student > Master 14 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 16%
Unspecified 9 11%
Researcher 8 10%
Other 20 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 36%
Social Sciences 20 24%
Unspecified 13 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 7 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 November 2016.
All research outputs
#2,708,477
of 12,321,014 outputs
Outputs from AIDS & Behavior
#390
of 2,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,951
of 276,124 outputs
Outputs of similar age from AIDS & Behavior
#23
of 113 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,321,014 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,338 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,124 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 113 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.