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Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome presenting as hemophagocytic syndrome: two case reports

Overview of attention for article published in SpringerPlus, March 2016
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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Readers on

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18 Mendeley
Title
Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome presenting as hemophagocytic syndrome: two case reports
Published in
SpringerPlus, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40064-016-2010-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Akihito Kitao, Ryuji Ieki, Hiroki Takatsu, Yuki Tachibana, Masaaki Nagae, Takuya Hino, Hitoshi Nakaji, Masayuki Shimojima, Masayuki Saijo, Masanobu Okayama, Tsuneaki Kenzaka

Abstract

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging infectious disease that was first reported in China in 2011. However, it is now endemic in Japan, and the SFTS viruses in Japan and China have evolved independently. Its fatality rate is 26.5 % in Japan, and the viral load is related to morbidity. We encountered two patients with SFTS. Case 1 is a 72-year-old woman who visited our hospital owing to severe fatigue, diarrhea, and nausea. Her consciousness level score on the Glasgow Coma Scale was 14 points, and her serum lactate dehydrogenase level was 646 IU/L. Case 2 is an 82-year-old woman who visited our hospital owing to diarrhea and general fatigue. Her consciousness level score on the Glasgow Coma Scale was 11 points, and her serum lactate dehydrogenase level was 935 IU/L. Both patients had hemophagocytic syndrome and presented with similar symptoms. Although both were treated with similar drug regimens, their clinical courses were different: after treatment, the 72-year-old woman survived whereas the 82-year-old woman died. In addition to age, the two patients differed in terms of time between symptom onset and treatment initiation, consciousness level, viral load, and extent of elevation of liver enzyme levels. The viral load, which is a predictor of morbidity, was associated with the level of consciousness and the serum lactate dehydrogenase level, both of which might be useful for predicting death in patients with SFTS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Uruguay 1 6%
Unknown 17 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 22%
Other 2 11%
Professor 2 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Other 4 22%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 11%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 6%
Computer Science 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 6 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 September 2016.
All research outputs
#15,368,104
of 22,862,742 outputs
Outputs from SpringerPlus
#932
of 1,849 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#180,001
of 300,128 outputs
Outputs of similar age from SpringerPlus
#80
of 154 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,862,742 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,849 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,128 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 154 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.