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Enhanced Olfactory Sensory Perception of Threat in Anxiety: An Event-Related fMRI Study

Overview of attention for article published in Chemosensory Perception, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#7 of 108)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
18 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Enhanced Olfactory Sensory Perception of Threat in Anxiety: An Event-Related fMRI Study
Published in
Chemosensory Perception, January 2012
DOI 10.1007/s12078-011-9111-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth A. Krusemark, Wen Li

Abstract

The current conceptualization of threat processing in anxiety emphasizes emotional hyper-reactivity, which mediates various debilitating symptoms and derangements in anxiety disorders. Here, we investigated olfactory sensory perception of threat as an alternative causal mechanism of anxiety. Combining an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm with an olfactory discrimination task, we examined how anxiety modulates basic perception of olfactory threats at behavioral and neural levels. In spite of subthreshold presentation of negative and neutral odors, a positive systematic association emerged between negative odor discrimination accuracy and anxiety levels. In parallel, the right olfactory primary (piriform) cortex indicated augmented response to subthreshold negative (vs. neutral) odors as a function of individual differences in anxiety. Using a psychophysiological interaction analysis, we further demonstrated amplified functional connectivity between the piriform cortex and emotion-related regions (amygdala and hippocampus) in response to negative odor, particularly in anxiety. Finally, anxiety also intensified skin conductance response to negative (vs. neutral) odor, indicative of potentiated emotional arousal to subliminal olfactory threat in anxiety. Together, these findings elucidate exaggerated processing of olfactory threat in anxiety across behavioral, autonomic physiological, and neural domains. Critically, our data emphasized anxiety-related hyper-sensitivity of the primary olfactory cortex and basic olfactory perception in response to threat, highlighting neurosensory mechanisms that may underlie the deleterious symptoms of anxiety.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
France 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Czechia 1 2%
Unknown 56 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 30%
Researcher 12 20%
Student > Master 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 12 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 36 59%
Neuroscience 7 11%
Unspecified 6 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Other 4 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 58. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2017.
All research outputs
#303,338
of 13,599,173 outputs
Outputs from Chemosensory Perception
#7
of 108 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,976
of 121,017 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Chemosensory Perception
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,599,173 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 108 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 121,017 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them