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Heterosexual Male Carriers Could Explain Persistence of Homosexuality in Men: Individual-Based Simulations of an X-Linked Inheritance Model

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
77 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
Title
Heterosexual Male Carriers Could Explain Persistence of Homosexuality in Men: Individual-Based Simulations of an X-Linked Inheritance Model
Published in
Archives of Sexual Behavior, April 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10508-016-0742-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Giorgi Chaladze

Abstract

Homosexuality has been documented throughout history and is found in almost all human cultures. Twin studies suggest that homosexuality is to some extent heritable. However, from an evolutionary perspective, this poses a problem: Male homosexuals tend to have on average five times fewer children than heterosexual males, so how can a phenomenon associated with low reproductive success be maintained at relatively stable frequencies? Recent findings of increased maternal fecundity of male homosexuals suggest that the genes responsible for homosexuality in males increase fecundity in the females who carry them. Can an increase in maternal fecundity compensate for the fecundity reduction in homosexual men and produce a stable polymorphism? In the current study, this problem was addressed with an individual-based modeling (IBM) approach. IBM suggests that male homosexuality can be maintained in a population at low and stable frequencies if roughly more than half of the females and half of the males are carriers of genes that predispose the male to homosexuality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 77 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Norway 1 2%
Unknown 40 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 18 44%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 17%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Professor 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 9 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 15%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 151. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2020.
All research outputs
#107,461
of 14,368,385 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#82
of 2,603 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,813
of 264,326 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#3
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,368,385 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,603 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,326 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.