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Climate Zone Delineation: Evaluating Approaches for Use in Natural Resource Management

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Management, March 2012
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1 tweeter

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
Title
Climate Zone Delineation: Evaluating Approaches for Use in Natural Resource Management
Published in
Environmental Management, March 2012
DOI 10.1007/s00267-012-9827-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael T. Tercek, Stephen T. Gray, Christopher M. Nicholson

Abstract

Recent efforts by the United States Department of the Interior (DOI) have the potential to make climate zones the basic geographic units guiding monitoring and resource management programs in the western U.S. We evaluated a new National Park Service approach for delineating climate zones that will likely be a model for other DOI agencies. Using the test case of the Greater Yellowstone Area in Wyoming, Montana and Idaho, we conducted three separate analyses, each based on a different dataset. Cluster analysis of 1971-2000 temperature and precipitation normals grouped weather stations according to similarities in seasonal patterns. Principal Components Analysis (PCAs) of 1895-2008 monthly data grouped stations by similarities in long-term variability. Finally, an analysis of snow data further subdivided the zones defined by the other two analyses. The climate zones produced by the cluster analysis and the PCAs were roughly similar to each other, but the differences were significant. The two sets of zones may be useful for different applications. For example, studies that analyze links between climate patterns and the demography of threatened species should focus on the results of the PCAs. The broad similarity among results produced by the different approaches supported the application of these zones in climate-related monitoring and analysis. However, since choices in data and methodology can affect the details of maps depicting zone boundaries, there are practical limitations to their use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 4%
Mexico 1 4%
Canada 1 4%
Unknown 24 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 33%
Unspecified 5 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 19%
Student > Master 5 19%
Other 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 9 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 19%
Unspecified 5 19%
Social Sciences 4 15%
Decision Sciences 1 4%
Other 3 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 March 2012.
All research outputs
#7,643,383
of 12,230,855 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Management
#807
of 1,118 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,487
of 113,615 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Management
#8
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,230,855 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,118 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 113,615 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.